Tag Archives: Navy

JMSDF Detachment visits Kaneohe Bay

LT Jan R. Krsak
Public Affairs Officer
VP-4 Kaneohe Bay, HI

On Monday, September 21 2015, The Japanese Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF) Detachment 50 from Patrol Squadron 5 arrived at Marine Corps Base Hawaii. JMSDF Patrol Squadron 5 is based in Naha Air Base on the island of Okinawa and currently flies the P-3 Orion Maritime Patrol Aircraft. Over a span of 4,500 miles, the squadron managed to bring two aircraft and full maintenance support. JMSDF will be working in conjunction with Patrol Squadron 4 (VP-4) for about three weeks aiming to foster international relations and cohesiveness between the JMSDF and United States Navy.

On Friday, September 25, the JMSDF conducted a local area familiarization flight with one of VP-4’s combat air crews. “I was impressed with their professionalism and crew cohesiveness. I was also fascinated by how well maintained and clean their aircraft was.” Said LT Jack Turner, a pilot assigned to VP-4.

The detachment is projected to conduct a torpedo exercise and joint coordinated operations with U.S. Navy ships and aircraft. The exercises designed to continuously contribute to honorable international relations between the JMSDF and United States Navy.

Japan navy

Last Cold Warrior Deploying to WESTPAC

http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=74670

From VP-62 Public Affairs
VP-62 WESTPAC Patch

NAVAL AIR STATION JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (NNS) — As Patrol Squadron Six Two (VP-62) begins the first ever mobilization of a Reserve P-3 squadron, one of the Reservists heading to Japan is also one of the last Cold War anti-submarine warfare operators still serving in the Navy.

Before getting on the plane, Master Chief Naval Aircrewman (NAC/AW) Spence Cunningham took a moment to look back on his 32 years of Naval Aviation experience.

I joined the Navy via the Delayed Entry Program in February 1981 and left for Boot Camp in Orlando in August of 1981. I completed the Anti-Submarine Warfare Operator pipeline (Non-Acoustic) in August 1982 and received orders to the Pelicans of VP-45. I completed three deployments between 1982 and 1986. I was screened and selected for instructor duty at VP-30, where I taught the Update 2, 2.5 and 3 versions of the Orion.

I completed the shore tour at VP-30 and an opportunity to work on the P-7 program was a good one, so I separated in August of 1990 and received orders to the Broadarrows of VP-62. I left active duty as an AW1. When I joined the squadron, the annual training periods consisted of the squadron setting up shop in Bermuda and we covered that ASW sector until all the Reservists completed their two-week requirements. The squadron was the last Reserve VP squadron to operate fully out of NAS Bermuda in 1991. After that, operations moved to a detachment form of annual training, where crew and maintenance formed small units and went forward to various sites like Roosevelt Roads, Puerto Rico; Sigonella, Sicily; Manta, Ecuador; Keflavik, Iceland and Comolapa, El Salvador, to name a few.

While I have been attached to VP-62, I have held many positions from NATOPS ‘Bluecard’ instructor to detachment CPO (chief petty officer) and up to Command Master Chief. All the while, maintaining combat aircrew qualifications to answer the call if needed.

I reached the 30-year high year tenure mark for Master Chief in February 2011, and I decided to transfer to the Volunteer Training Unit versus retirement. I decided to continue to serve, because I love what I do in the P-3 and I want to give the benefit of my experience to those junior operators that are the future of maritime patrol.

I have been very fortunate that the civilian positions I have held had a direct relationship to my Navy Reserve job. I have held positions with several local Jacksonville defense contractors that have supported the training efforts of the P-3 force that have included curriculum development, specifically the Block Mod Update and ASUW Improvement Programs for the P-3. I was also an initial member of, and later managed the Revision and Maintenance effort for the P-3 Fleet Replacement Squadron, VP-30.

Presently, I am the lead instructor for the Acoustic Track Contract Instructor cadre at VP-30. I lead ten civilian instructors in executing the initial P-3C Acoustic Operator curriculum for acoustic AWO trainees. We are responsible for completing all ground phase requirements that include classroom instruction, aircraft demonstrations, part-task trainer periods and Tactical Operational Readiness Trainers (TORT) which are full tactical crew scenarios.

I have been a sensor operator from the beginning. Actually, I completed my pipeline training as a SS-3 operator, but the needs of my first squadron dictated (by my Shop Chief) my On-The-Job (OJT) conversion to operating the acoustic sensor. I got a two-week course on acoustic analysis and departed on my first deployment to Sigonella, Sicily. I am the last AW to earn a 7821 NEC by OJT before the instruction changed that required completion of a formal curriculum to earn NECs.

All of my efforts overseas have had their moments. My first deployment had an erupting Mt. Etna that covered NAS Sig in a 1-inch layer of ash. That affected the Engine Driven Compressors (air conditioning) on the aircraft which meant many a flight was conducted in a minimalist fashion when it came to being comfortable.

That same deployment, Mummar Qadaffi set his line of death and we were flying armed patrols in support of Sixth Fleet carriers crossing the line. The Marines were car-bombed in Lebanon during that deployment, and once again we were flying armed patrols. VP-45 flew on multiple Soviet submarines from Victors and Charlies, to Tangos and Foxtrots. The squadron set a record for the most submerged contact time to date during that 1983 deployment.

My second deployment was my first as a newly minted Sensor One. I cut my chops on the challenging Soviet Echo II that entered the Mediterranean Sea through the Straits of Gibraltar. That was a first class ASW challenge considering the sensors we were using back then. I was successful by turning over hot contact to the following crew, but to say I was nervous was an understatement.

My appreciation for the job was not fully realized until my third deployment to the island of Bermuda. The Soviets consistently deployed the “Yankee” class submarines between Bermuda and the east coast of the United States. Our job was to stay “on-top” around the clock while they were present. One submarine decided to test the theory by straying further west. We were on-top and were given authorization to let them know we were there. We did this by going active and after a few hours of relentless pinging, the Yankee moved back. During debrief, the crew was told that an entire B-52 wing had moved inland during that excursion. I was stunned at the information. Here it was that a lowly Naval Aircrewman 2nd Class’s efforts in running his sensor was standing between a Yankee and its missiles and the East Coast. Doing this job was just “fun” up until then. It still is, but I never considered the broader implications of what I do on the aircraft and I have never forgotten that since.

This is my first mobilization as a Reservist. I have been in a hardware unit the entire time. Since I was tied to Combat Aircrew Readiness, performing an Individual Augmentee position was possible, but not encouraged given the limited number of Sensor One operators VP-62 has.

My expectations on this deployment are what any acoustic operator worth his or her salt should be, tracking submarines. Being primarily an Atlantic Fleet operator, I look forward to working in the western Pacific against some very challenging submarines found in that area of the world. I relish the challenge and look forward to sharing my experience with some young fleet operators out there, not to mention getting to experience liberty in the exotic countries of the Western Pacific.

I am the last of the Cold Warriors that are still actively flying in the P-3. I have acoustic sensor experience that runs the gamut from AN/AQA-7 paper grams to the current AN-USQ-78B Acoustic Processor Technical Refresh (APTR). I have hours upon hours of on-top time of a multitude of submarines in many of the world’s oceans. This is what I have spent the last 30 years of my life doing and I cannot think of any other job I’d rather perform. I have certainly had an exceptional run and I have to give a lion share of credit to the Reserves to enable me to enjoy the best of both my worlds. It is time for me to hang my flight suit up after this deployment and I will miss the flying. But most of all I will miss those Sailors in VP-62. I am grateful to serve among such a group of dedicated professionals. I am humbled and appreciative of the privilege.

For more news from Patrol Squadron 62, and the WESTPAC deployment visit www.navy.mil/local/vp62/.

NAS Jax hosts MPRF Reunion/Symposium | jacksonville.com

via NAS Jax hosts MPRF Reunion/Symposium | jacksonville.com.

[nggallery id=28]

By Lt. Michael Garcia
VP-30 PAO

The fourth Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Force (MPRF) Reunion and Symposium took place March 26–30 at NAS Jacksonville, hosted by Patrol Squadron (VP) 30 and Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing (CPRW) 11.

More than 500 active duty, reserve and retired maritime patrol personnel from around the world gathered to share ideas and experiences, as well as to catch up with former squadron mates. All Navy MPRF commands were represented, along with Maritime Patrol Forces from Canada, the United Kingdom and Australia. Admiral John Harvey Jr., commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command was the symposium guest speaker.
This year’s reunion focused on recognizing the community’s historical contributions while looking forward to its bright future. The event was unique in that it also marked the much anticipated “roll-out” of the first operational P-8A Poseidon aircraft – which is set to replace the venerable P-3C Orion. VP-30 Commanding Officer and master of ceremonies for the Fleet Introduction, Capt. Mark Stevens, captured the importance of this historic event, “In the same year that our Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Force is celebrating 50 years of service for the P-3 Orion – we’re also celebrating the Fleet Introduction of P-8 Poseidon.”
The reunion kicked off with the Commander’s Conference that was followed by a variety of briefs, discussions, round tables and panels geared towards exchanging community experiences, current operations and ideas. Wednesday’s P-8A roll-out and the ribbon-cutting for the P-8A Integrated Training Center were highlights of the week. These events drew national media attention and the guest list included Under Secretary of the Navy Robert Work, Vice Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Mark Ferguson, Jacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown and Boeing President and CEO of Defense, Space and Security Dennis Muilenburg.
Throughout the week, outside of the briefs and meetings, participants were able to enjoy gatherings that included the Maritime Patrol Association (MPA) Heritage Dinner, MPA Golf Tournament and the Military Officers Association of America (MOAA) Luncheon. A popular event for many was the Flight Suit Social that capped the week of festivities at the NAS Jacksonville Officers’ Club. Old squadron mates had the opportunity to reflect on their MPA heritage, mingle with old friends and swap sea stories in a relaxed atmosphere.
Another highlight of the week was the MPA Technology Expo in the VP-30 Hangar, where visitors explored exhibits hosted by Boeing, ASEC, WYLE, MOAA, Carley, Lockheed-Martin, and the local MTOC 7 team. Also on display was a full-scale BAMS Demonstration model, a P-8A flight simulator and the Boeing P-8A trailer that included a fully functional tactical crew simulator.
In their remarks on the symposium’s final day, both Adm. Harvey and Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Group Rear Adm. Michael Hewitt spoke to the community’s history and future. They praised the personnel who fly and fight these aircraft, and remarked about the responsibilities placed on the shoulders of these Sailors to carry MPRF heritage into the future.
Fittingly, the MOAA recognized one such leader, VP-30 Executive Officer Cmdr. Tony Parton, with the 2012 MPRF Lifetime Leadership Award – for his career-long advancement of the community – and all of those with whom he’s worked during his distinguished career.
Additional recognition for excellence was given to the Combat Aircrews (CAC) who participated in the 2012 Anti-submarine Warfare (ASW) Fleet Challenge. The Fleet Challenge is an opportunity for the top CACs from each squadron to demonstrate their ASW prowess. Hewitt announced this year’s champion, CAC 1 of VP-4 from MCBH Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii.
Participants at the 2012 MPRF Reunion and Symposium returned to their commands to share with the rest of the community the information they gathered and to pass on the messages from the Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Community leadership.

 

Your Navy TODAY (Apr 11 2012)

Your Navy TODAY – Enterprise in the Bab el-Mandeb Strait; Assistant SecNav Talks 21st Century.

Your Navy TODAY – Enterprise in the Bab el-Mandeb Strait; Assistant SecNav Talks 21st Century

On any given day, in your Navy, our team of more than 600,000 professional Sailors and Civilians are working together around the globe to perform our mission: deter aggression and, if deterrence fails, win our Nation’s wars. It is not possible to share every aspect of this global team but, through this blog, we offer you a glimpse of what these men and women do.

 

A landing craft air cushion (LCAC) approaches the well deck of the amphibious transport dock ship USS New York (LPD 21) after pre-staging 24th Marine Expeditionary Unit (24th MEU) assets in Cap Draa, Morocco, before the commencement of Operation African Lion 2012. African Lion 2012 is a bi-lateral training exercise between the United States and the Royal Moroccan Armed Forces. Iwo Jima is the flagship of the Iwo Jima Amphibious Ready Group is deployed with the embarked 24th MEU in the U.S. 6th Fleet area of responsibility.

 

The aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN 65) and the guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 69) transit the Bab el-Mandeb Strait. Enterprise and Vicksburg are deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions for Operation Enduring Freedom.

 

Boatswain’s Mate 3rd Class Robert Chittenden signals for an MH-60R Sea Hawk helicopter assigned to the Swamp Foxes of Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 74 to take off from the flight deck of the littoral combat ship USS Independence (LCS 2). Sailors from Independence’s Gold crew and embarked Mine Countermeasures Detachment 1 are underway for the ship’s transit to San Diego after successfully completing testing on the mine countermeasures mission package.

 

 

Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Manpower and Reserve Affairs Juan M. Garcia conducts an all-hands call during a visit to Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay to promote sexual assault awareness during the 21st Century Sailor and Marine initiative. The initiative consolidates a set of objectives and policies, new and existing, to maximize Sailor and Marine personal readiness, build resiliency and hone combat effectiveness.

 

 


Navy Personnel
Active Duty: 323,773
Officers Officers: 53,120
Enlisted Enlisted: 266,146
Midshipmen Midshipmen: 4,507
Ready Reserve: 105,157 [As of Feb 2012 ]
Selected Reserves Selected Reserves: 64,118
Individual Ready Reserve Individual Ready Reserve: 41,039
Reserves currently mobilized: 4,668 [As of 03 Apr 2012]
Personnel on deployment: 47,943
Navy Department Civilian Employees: 203,609
Ships and Submarines
Deployable Battle Force Ships: 282
Total Ships Underway Total Ships Underway: 110 (39% of total)
Deployed Ships Underway Deployed Ships Underway: 66 (23% of total)
Attack Submarines Underway Attack Submarines Underway: 33
Other Underway Other Underway: 44 (15% of total)
Total Ships Deployed/Underway Total Ships Deployed/Underway: 151 (54% of total)
Ships Underway
Underway Aircraft Carriers:
USS Enterprise (CVN 65) – 5th Fleet
USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70) – 5th Fleet
USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) – 5th Fleet
USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) – port visit San Diego
Underway Amphibious Assault Ships:
USS Peleliu (LHA 5) – Pacific Ocean
USS Wasp (LHD 1) – Atlantic Ocean
USS Essex (LHD 2) – port visit Sasebo, JA
USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD 6) – port visit Sasebo, JA
USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7) – Atlantic Ocean
USS Makin Island (LHD 8) – 5th Fleet

Aircraft (operational):
3700+

 

Recap of 2012 MPA symposium

By: John Lasron
Posted: 03 Apr 2012

 

Greetings everyone,

Here is the recap of this year’s MPA symposium. It was held from March 27th through March 30th at NAS Jacksonville, FL.

On the first day we had the members meeting. Since the MPA was formed last September, there are over 700 members. Active duty is 319 and retired is 323. There are 6 volunteer members on the board, all officers. They would like to get an enlisted person for the 7th member. They will be elections in the future for the board. There are National officers. The president is Commodore Wheeler, CPW 11 and the vice-president is Capt. Stevens, CO of VP-30. At the present time, all future symposiums will be held at NAS Jacksonville. There are 4 chapters, Wash D.C., Pax River, Whidbey Island, and Hawaii.

There are has been a Hall of Honor started at the ITC (Integrated Training Center). It is a new facility that was dedicated at the symposium. One wall has the Navy Medal of Honor awardees, and the wall across is dedicated to those who have been inducted into the Maritime Hall of Honor. I will mention this year’s inductees later on.

Some things the MPA wants to do in the future, is develop a MPA scholarship fund, and the growth of new chapters.

At the reception that night, we talked to a member of the reserve squadron. The squadron is back to the old days. They have their own aircraft again. With the active squadrons getting P-8’s and in transition, the reserves will have to pick up the slack. Individuals will mobilize for 4 months and this will last a few years.

On day two was the roll out of the P-8 and its delivery to VP-30. I was chatting with the Canadian Commodore before the ceremony. They have a little over half of their aircraft updated. They are getting new wings, tall, aft bulkhead and repairs around tank 5. They are getting a new avionics package. They say it is as good as the U.S. AIP planes.

There were British, Canadian, Australian, New Zealand, and Japanese in Jacksonville during the week as we celebrated the 50th anniversary of the P-3.

At the rollout ceremony, the dignitaries were, Under Secretary of the Navy, Honorable Robert Work, Vice Chief of Naval Operations, Admiral Mark Ferguson, Commander Naval Air Force, Vice Admiral Allen Myers, Commander Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Group, RADM Hewitt, Mayor Alvin Brown, and Mr. Dennis Muilenburg, President and CEO of Boeing Defense, Space and Security.

After the rollout, the ITC building had a ribbon cutting ceremony. There are now 4 full motion cockpit simulators with room for 10. There is room for 9 weapons trainers, with the 5 tactical crewmember positions. Each station is interchangeable. They are “on the rail”. With the Tacco in the middle, the Nav is to the left and then the SS3. To the right of the Tacco would be the acoustic sensor operators. Again they could be in any seat. None of the equipment was turned on, so we could not see any displays. The Commodore said that the current generation doesn’t like the rail system, while the old guys prefer that. The classrooms will have an instructor and stations were the students study. They have two large screens on top of each other. They are the same as in the airplane. The students will learn at their own pace. If most are having trouble then the instructor will go back to instructing. The P-3 training was 70% flying and 30% simulators. The P-8 will be 70% simulators and 30% flying.

Here is some info on the crews. There will be 3 pilots (if over 6 hrs. of flying). The tacco and nav. There will be 4 AW’s. One will be loading the sonobuoys. If there won’t be any ASW, then there would 1 acoustic operator and 2 SS-3’s. So there is a total of 9 crewmembers. There will be a plane captain assigned to the plane. He won’t fly with the crew, unless they are going on a det and then would accompany the crew. There are 21 seat positions on the aircraft.

We then took a tour of the aircraft. I took a lot of pictures inside. I started at the front and worked backwards. The cockpit has a heads-up display. All the info you need is right in front of your eyes for flying. The plane can hold about 65 K of fuel. There is a refueling capability. But that won’t be used until about 2015. The limiting factor is oil in the engine and possible crew time. There is an airline galley where they can cook their meals. No more cruise boxes and hopefully box lunches. Next comes the head, I didn’t look inside, but assume it is a standard airline bathroom. Then next to head, are the 2 crew rest seats. They fully recline. Father back was the crew stations with seats next to them. There were not many avionics bays, no main load center and very few circuit breakers. Then there were the sono racks. They have a total capacity of 121 buoys. There are 3 circular buoy containers, each one holds 10. There were 3 individual launchers, and you don’t have to depressurize. They can monitor 64 buoys. The AIP planes can monitor 32 buoys. The bomb bay is behind the wing. They will carry the MK 54 Torpedo and the Harpoons. In the back of the plane is a storage area, for the lobsters, Coors beer, the furniture, and motorcycles. GEE DUNK!!

The Tacco who was on board was at Pax River and has been on the plane 3 years. She said that top screen you could have radar and IRDS, split screen. On the bottom CRT you could have the grams.

Then in the afternoon we received our briefing. Commodore Wheeler started off the briefs. Also in attendance were Commodores from Whidbey Is and Kaneohe. We also had CTF 72, CTF 57 and CTE 67 there to brief us.

Last year during the briefing, they would not show the Maverick firing on a Libyan small craft. We got to see it this year. The Maritime Patrol and Recon forces is 18 squadrons, 6169 sailors= 1186 Officers and 4983 Enlisted. There are 127 aircraft and 65 mission capable aircraft. VPU-1 and VQ-2 are going away this year. So they will be incorporated into the other squadrons. Info from Whidbey Is, VP-1 now is deployed in El Salvador and Misawa. There are 4 P-3 squadrons there. VQ-1 will have 12 crews and 600 sailors after the consolidation. Hawaii has 4 squadrons. Jacksonville has 7 P-3 squadrons. VP-16 will be the first to transition to the P-8 when they come back from deployment. First P-8 deployment will be Dec 2013. One squadron will transition every 6 months. All the Jax squadrons will get the plane first then probably Whidbey Is and then Hawaii. There will be 12 crews and 6 planes in each squadron.

They then talked about the different threats. Iranian subs don’t go far from home. They are kind of novice at it. The Iranian P-3’s are still flying out of Bandar Abbas. The PRC (Peoples Republic of China) are now going East of Guam. Their ops are getting more complex. The PRC claims a lot of the South China Sea and that has the countries around it concerned. So we have had a crew go into Cambodia, search and rescue exercise with Vietnam. We are also going back into Cubi Pt. That drew a big cheer from the attendees.

Deployment sights for Jax are to El Salvador and Misawa. The squadron out of Misawa helped out after the earthquake with mapping the debris field last year. We have not had deployments to Misawa for 4 years. Whidbey Is goes to Kadena, Bahrain and Qatar. Kaneohe is going to Sicily and Djibouti. VQ is in Crete, Curacao and Qatar. We left Diego Garcia in 2006

With the tension with Iran and their treats of shutting down the Straits of Hormuz, the aircraft carriers want 4 armed P-3 in the area to verify the threats. The UAV’s (BAMS) have been flying now for 3 years. There are 5 of them and 1 is forward deployed. They can do 24 hr. missions. The carriers also want BAMS coverage on the Straits of Hormuz.

Then that night we had the Heritage Dinner. There were 3 new inductees into the Hall of Honor. Commander Scott Carpenter. He flew P-2V’s in VP-6. He was the 4 into space and the second to orbit the Earth. Also inducted were Captain Isbell and RADM Wolkensdorfer. The Admiral’s wife was there to accept the honor. P-3 crews with the highest proficiency in ASW would be awarded the Isbell trophy.

VADM Harris was the guest speaker. He is the Assistant to the Chairman of JCS. He has a P-3 background (VP-44, VP-4, and VP-46).

We had in attendance the original acceptance crew for the first P-3A. They flew the plane from Burbank, CA to NAS Jacksonville in 1962. Everyone received a coin commemorating the 50th anniversary of the P-3.

Those are the highlights of this year’s MPA symposium. You can look at the pictures I took at

http://patrolaviationjaxmarch2012.shutterfly.com

I hope to put my video on the internet. It was taken during the rollout ceremony.

I hope you enjoyed this briefing and getting to see the inside of the new P-8.

John Larson

Your Navy TODAY (Mar. 30, 2012)

Your Navy TODAY (Mar. 30, 2012).

On any given day, in your Navy, our team of more than 600,000 professional Sailors and Civilians are working together around the globe to perform our mission: deter aggression and, if deterrence fails, win our Nation’s wars. It is not possible to share every aspect of this global team but, through this blog, we offer you a glimpse of what these men and women do.

 

Marines from Battalion Landing Team 1/2 pilot amphibious assault vehicles into the well deck of the amphibious transport dock ship USS New York (LPD 21) as the amphibious assault ship USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7) transits nearby. New York is deployed as part of the Iwo Jima Amphibious Ready Group with the embarked 24th Marine Expeditionary Unit (24th MEU) in support of maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility.

 

Chief petty officers march in formation to join their fellow chiefs during morning colors at Commander, Fleet Activities Yokosuka. April 1 marks the 119th anniversary of the chief petty officer rank.

 

A P-8A Poseidon, the Navy’s newest patrol aircraft, conducts a flyover above the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69). Dwight D. Eisenhower is underway conducting training in the Atlantic Ocean.

 

Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class Lauren Coons looks over Sailors chosen to simulate casualties for a mass casualty drill aboard the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69). Dwight D. Eisenhower is underway conducting training in the Atlantic Ocean.

 


Navy Personnel
Active Duty: 323,773
Officers Officers: 53,120
Enlisted Enlisted: 266,146
Midshipmen Midshipmen: 4,507
Ready Reserve: 105,157 [As of Feb 2012 ]
Selected Reserves Selected Reserves: 64,118
Individual Ready Reserve Individual Ready Reserve: 41,039
Reserves currently mobilized: 4,478 [As of 20 Mar 2012]
Personnel on deployment: 47,943
Navy Department Civilian Employees: 203,609
Ships and Submarines
Deployable Battle Force Ships: 282
Total Ships Underway Total Ships Underway: 97 (35% of total)
Deployed Ships Underway Deployed Ships Underway: 64 (22% of total)
Attack Submarines Underway Attack Submarines Underway: 33
Other Underway Other Underway: 33 (11% of total)
Total Ships Deployed/Underway Total Ships Deployed/Underway: 138 (49% of total)
Ships Underway
Underway Aircraft Carriers:
USS Enterprise (CVN 65) – port visit Piraeus, GR
USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) – Atlantic Ocean
USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70) – 5th Fleet
USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) – 5th Fleet
Underway Amphibious Assault Ships:
USS Peleliu (LHA 5) – Pacific Ocean
USS Essex (LHD 2) – 7th Fleet
USS Kearsarge (LHD 3) – Atlantic Ocean
USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD 6) – 7th Fleet
USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7) – Atlantic Ocean
USS Makin Island (LHD 8) – 5th Fleet

Aircraft (operational):
3700+

 

Your Navy TODAY (Mar. 28, 2012)

BY XANDER GAMBLE – MARCH 28, 2012

On any given day, in your Navy, our team of more than 600,000 professional Sailors and Civilians are working together around the globe to perform our mission: deter aggression and, if deterrence fails, win our Nation’s wars. It is not possible to share every aspect of this global team but, through this blog, we offer you a glimpse of what these men and women do.

Vice Adm. Allen G. Myers, left, commander of Naval Air Forces, Adm. Mark Ferguson, Vice Chief of Naval Operations, Under Secretary of the Navy Robert O. Work, Jacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown, and Rear Adm. Michael W. Hewitt , commander of Patrol and Reconnaissance Group, pose for a photo after a ceremony to formally introduce the P-8A Poseidon into Patrol Squadron (VP) 30 at Naval Air Station Jacksonville.

120327-N-ED185-205 MEDITERRANEAN SEA (March 27, 2012) Sailors wash an F/A-18E Super Hornet on the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN 65). Enterprise is deployed as part of the Enterprise Carrier Strike Group supporting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 6th Fleet area of responsibility. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Brian G. Reynolds/Released)

120325-N-LI693-009 PANAMA CANAL, Panama (March 25, 2012) Diesel electric tractors, called mules after the original method of towing, guide the amphibious transport dock ship Pre-Commissioning Unit (PCU) San Diego (LPD 22) as the ship enters Gatun locks, the first in a series of three, during their transit through the Panama Canal. San Diego, the sixth ship in the San Antonio amphibious class, is on her maiden voyage en route to her future homeport and namesake city following construction at Huntington Ingalls Shipyard in Pascagoula, Miss. San Diego will be commissioned in San Diego in May 2012. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist Holly Boynton/Released)

120328-N-DB801-462 SOUTH CHINA SEA (March 28, 2012) Gunner's Mate 1st Class Eduardo Soto, right, instructs Information Systems Technician 3rd Class Matthew Rozeboom on firing a .50-caliber machine gun during a live-fire exercise aboard the U.S. 7th Fleet flagship USS Blue Ridge (LCC 19). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Steven Khor/Released)

Navy Personnel
Active Duty: 323,773
Officers Officers: 53,120
Enlisted Enlisted: 266,146
Midshipmen Midshipmen: 4,507
Ready Reserve: 105,157 [As of Feb 2012 ]
Selected Reserves Selected Reserves: 64,118
Individual Ready Reserve Individual Ready Reserve: 41,039
Reserves currently mobilized: 4,478 [As of 20 Mar 2012]
Personnel on deployment: 47,943
Navy Department Civilian Employees: 203,609
Ships and Submarines
Deployable Battle Force Ships: 282
Total Ships Underway Total Ships Underway: 98 (35% of total)
Deployed Ships Underway Deployed Ships Underway: 63 (22% of total)
Attack Submarines Underway Attack Submarines Underway: 33
Other Underway Other Underway: 35 (12% of total)
Total Ships Deployed/Underway Total Ships Deployed/Underway: 140 (49% of total)
Ships Underway
Underway Aircraft Carriers:
USS Enterprise (CVN 65) – port visit Piraeus, GR
USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) – Atlantic Ocean
USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70) – port visit Jebel Ali, AE
USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) – 5th Fleet
Underway Amphibious Assault Ships:
USS Peleliu (LHA 5) – Pacific Ocean
USS Essex (LHD 2) – 7th Fleet
USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD 6) – 7th Fleet
USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7) – Atlantic Ocean
USS Makin Island (LHD 8) – 5th Fleet

Aircraft (operational):
3700+

VP-4 Celebrates African-American History Month

March 15, 2012
LTJG Jenna Rose
VP-4 PAO

 

On 24 February 2012, VP-4’s Command Assessment Team (CAT) recognized African-American History month by having an educational session and potluck. More than thirty people participated in the event. In addition to enjoying the food, the CAT spent time recognizing important African-Americans in both naval and American history. These individuals ranged from the first African-American President, Barack Obama, to the first African-American naval diver, Carl Brashear. “I was very impressed with how many people turned out for the event and how enthusiastic everyone was to share their views,” stated LTJG Robles, VP-4’s Command Management Equal Opportunity Officer. “It was interesting to learn about others and further celebrate and embrace our diversity,” stated LS1 Kushiyama, a CAT member.

The CAT has another educational potluck event planned for March 23, 2012 to celebrate Women’s history month.

 

 

 

 

 

 

VP-4’s CSADD Saves Stream

LTJG Jenna Rose, VP-4 PAO
March 5, 2012

 

On Saturday, February 18, 2012, Patrol Squadron Four’s (VP-4) Coalition of Sailors Against Destructive Decisions (CSADD) chapter partnered with the He’eia Stream Restoration project to protect the He’eia Stream. Continuing to strengthen community relations, the CSADD chapter worked with over thirty people from the local Kaneohe area clearing areas of non-native species and debris, spreading mulch, planting native species, and maintaining planted areas. “There were many invasive species taking up too much water, so it was important to eliminate those plants, while ensuring the native plants are able to grow in the area,” stated CSADD member AE3(AW) Garcia.

The He’eia Stream Project started in 2010 to restore 4000 feet of riparian habitat in He’eia Stream. In addition to rejuvenating the area, the future goal of the He’eia Stream Restoration project is to allow community groups to utilize the project as an educational experience. “It’s a great opportunity to volunteer and give back to the community, while spending time outdoors,” commented VP-4 CSADD President IS3 Mabry.

VP-4’s CSADD chapter was established in July 2011. While adhering to its mission statement, “Shipmates Helping Shipmates,” the organization works to create a culture in which its members maintain a course of success through good decision making. The chapter is actively involved with the community, and will be taking part in another He’eia Stream Project day on Saturday, March 17, 2012.

 

AWV3 Carrell, AMC McGennis (and his daughter), AZ3 Jordan, AE3(AW) Garcia, AWV2 Rogoff, and AZ3 Pollard participating in He'eia Stream Restoration Project in Kaneohe, Hawaii.

Weekend Warriors

Weekend Warriors
by LTJG Rose, VP-4 PAO

20 Feb 2012

February 11, 2012 – Early Saturday morning, while the other squadrons were waking up to decide which beach to spend the day, VP-4 was hard at work. The squadron spent time getting ahead; including introducing aircrew to a new mission planning, conducting alcohol and drug abuse prevention training, and executing four flights. Additionally, the squadron completed significant progress on two aircraft in long term maintenance periods.

Personnel lining up for burgers.

However, Saturday was not strictly business. To recognize the Skinny Dragons, Command Services held a burger burn to feed the entire squadron. Night check was acknowledged for their hard work with pizzas.

By putting in the additional time on Saturday, VP-4 was able to make progress in maintaining readiness.

LCDR Brassfield, MC1 Laird and AN Henning grilling lunch.

By displaying such dedication, it is easy to see that the Skinny Dragons continue to live up to their names, “Hawaii’s Best.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

P-3 Orion Research Group website

Dear all,

I am proud to announce that we have just uploaded the new P-3 Orion Research Group website!!

Besides a completely new layout we added an important new feature: our P-3 Aircraft Location History Report (ALHR) has now been published online! This report is giving the entire service life history for each individual P-3 Orion in the world. Our ALHR was last published eleven years ago in our “P-3 Orion Volume 2” booklet. Last year we decided that we will not publish a third booklet and instead we have now published the ALHR online. And there is more: it’s our intention to publish an updated ALHR four times a year.

Another change to the website is the news section. In the past this wasn’t refreshed as often as we wanted. Next to the news section we published our “Orion Nieuws” in Dutch language as a PDF document on the website. We have decided to quit publishing this Dutch news issues and instead we now publish this news in English as an integrated part of the website. Also for the news section it is our intention to publish new issues four times a year.

Please be advised that some sections of the new website are still under construction. And the text of other sections (like the history, variants and operators sections) still need to be updated. This will be done over the next few weeks. And of course we will be adding more photos to the existing pages over the next few weeks too.

We hope you will enjoy the new layout and especially the P-3 Aircraft Location History Report.

Regards,
Marco P.J. Borst and Jaap Dubbeldam
P-3 Orion Research Group – The Netherlands

 

Visit the site at: http://www.p3orion.nl/index.html

Ohlson, Bruce H. CDR VP-4 1955-58

Cdr. Bruce H. “Swede” Ohlson , USNR Ret. K7UAL

After a brief struggle with illness, Bruce “Swede” Hjalmar Ohlson took his last flight west for his final check on February 4, 2012. Bruce faced his final days with dignity and serenity.

 

Bruce was born on April 23, 1931 in Huntington, West Virginia. He grew up there experiencing all the usual lessons of childhood. Bruce enlisted in the US Navy, then took the opportunity to attend flight school courtesy of Uncle Sam. He was commissioned as an Ensign and assigned as a member of VP- 4 as a plane commander. This was an exceptional group of young men who flew anti-submarine patrols on 2 tours of the Far East. This group of young men, flying government supplied airplanes, had a very good time (probably too good of a time) and continue to hold regular reunions through the years. Bruce continued to serve his country in the United States Naval Reserve, finally retiring with the rank of Commander. After stepping down from Active Duty, Bruce worked briefly for Mohawk Airlines, then accepted a job flying for United Airlines. He flew for United for more than 36 years, retiring as a very senior Captain. Bruce always enjoyed flying large airplanes, and ended up flying 747’s to Europe, the Far East and South America. If United had a larger Airplane in its fleet, Bruce would have flown it. He was an exceptionally competent pilot, and walked away from every landing he ever made. Passengers for United Airlines were in very good hands when Bruce was in the cockpit. After his retirement from UAL, Bruce indulged his passion for Amateur radio. His ham shack had every conceivable band of radio in it, and if there had been an amateur radio operator on Mars, Bruce would have found a way to broadcast to him, as the nest of radio antennas in his yard would attest to. Bruce was a member of the Washoe County search and rescue team, helping to coordinate their communications from a mobile radio shack.

 

Bruce was married twice. He found the love of his life Diane Ohlson and married her on August 24, 1981. They stayed together for the duration of his life. Bruce raised 3 children.

 

Bruce was a man who was always there. If someone needed help he could be counted on to assist. If there was a meeting or a group to get organized, he would be in the thick of it. If he said he would be at one place at a specific time, he would be there. You could rely on Bruce to do his dead level best at anything he attempted. A day “loafing” with Bruce would exhaust a lesser person. He was a member of a select group of men that was taught to be as good as their word, and he expected that from everyone in his circle. Bruce was an achiever who led an exemplary life. He will be missed by everyone who knew him. Bruce is survived by his wife of thirty years Diane, of Reno, Nevada, his sister Sylvia of Virginia Beach, Virginia, his son Dana (Nancy) Ohlson of Grand Junction, Colorado, his daughter Kristin Ohlson Melnikoff (Harry) of Collbran Colorado, his daughter Tracy Hoobyar (Phil) of Reno Nevada and 6 grandchildren, Lauren, Amber, Daniel , Hannah, Brandon and Cody.

 

There will be a celebration of Bruce’s life at the family’s home in South Reno on Saturday, March 3, at 4 pm. Please call <Omited by VP-4 Association> for information and the address. In lieu of flowers the family asks for donations to be made to the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society in Bruce’s name.

 

 

Published in Reno Gazette-Journal on February 19, 2012

Navy Culinary Specialists-Without ‘em the Fleet Don’t Eat

Navy Culinary Specialists-Without ‘em the Fleet Don’t Eat.

Navy Culinary Specialists-Without ‘em the Fleet Don’t Eat

Gone are the days when Navy cooks just sling hash, serve “sh#t on a shingle,” and make Navy bean soup. Today’s culinary specialists (CS’s) are highly trained in preparing nutritious and delicious meals in sometimes less than ideal conditions. Whether it’s grilling on a ship operating in heavy seas, baking in a desert tent, sautéing while submerged in a submarine or braising at ten thousand feet–Navy CSs are deployed around the globe ensuring the men and women of America’s Navy operate at peak performance.

We know this food doesn’t magically appear when our Sailors are ready for it. Much planning and detail goes into menu preparation and food creation. Today’s CS’s have greater culinary instruction than ever before with even more advanced training on the way. Recently instruction and competition events were held in Norfolk and San Diego to help our would-be “Bobby Flays” and “Cat Coras” hone their skills and see how they stack-up against their peers. If you didn’t know any better you would think the clips below were pulled directly from Food Network orGordon Ramsey’s latest show on Fox.

Norfolk–“Top Chop” Mid-Atlantic Regional Galley Competition


San Diego– 5th annual “Iron Chef” Competition for Navy Region Southwest, judged by award winning chef, Sam “The Cooking Guy” Zien, of the Discovery Health network’s, “Just Cook This!”


Key Take Aways Regarding Navy Culinary Specialists:

– More than 7,000 deployed around the globe, feed on average more than 92 million wholesome and nutritious top quality meals per year, ensuring our fighting forces are operating at peak performance to respond to threats worldwide.

– Nothing impacts Sailors on a day-to-day basis more than the great food our CSs prepare for them-these top quality meals directly contribute to Sailor quality of life and morale.

Today’s CSs have greater culinary instruction than ever before-with even more advanced training on the way. Our Sailors, both afloat and ashore can look forward to healthier and better tasting meals in the near future.

P-3C Shines as Flexible CARAT Thailand Platform

P-3C Shines as Flexible CARAT Thailand Platform.

P-3C Shines as Flexible CARAT Thailand Platform

By Commander Task Force 73 Public Affairs

Posted: May 18, 2011

UTAPAO, Thailand – One of the oldest aircraft types in the U.S. Navy’s inventory has adapted to fill a variety of missions in recent years. This adaptability, and the fact that dozens of Navies around the world fly it or some variant of the airframe, made the P-3C Orion the ideal aircraft to participate in Cooperation Afloat Readiness and Training (CARAT) Thailand 2011.

Click for a closer look.

UTAPAO, Thailand (May 14, 2011) – A crew member assigned to Patrol Squadron (VP) 4, attaches a cover over the number two engine after returning from a U.S. / Thai mine-laying mission for Cooperation Afloat Readiness and Training (CARAT) Thailand 2011. CARAT is a series of bilateral exercises held annually in Southeast Asia to strengthen relationships and enhance force readiness. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Jose Lopez, Jr.)

During the nine-day CARAT exercise, Combat Air Crew 9, a detachment from the “Skinny Dragons” of Patrol Squadron Four (VP-4), based in Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii, shared best practices with Royal Thai Navy P-3 aircrews during several symposiums, discussing maintenance, operations, mine-laying and search and rescue procedures.

The two navies then boarded each other’s aircraft on the ground and in the air, conducting joint mine laying missions and participating in air defense exercise missions with combined U.S. and Thai Navy surface groups at sea.

“The Thai Navy flies the P-3, so there was a lot of commonality already in our work and procedures,” said Lt. Cmdr. Kim DaCosta, a P-3C pilot and VP-4’s Officer in Charge for the CARAT mission. “The Thai aircrews integrated well with our aircrews, and that’s exactly what this exercise is all about – becoming familiar with one another so when we are called to work together, there’s a baseline of understanding and trust already there.”

During the exercise, VP-4 and the Royal Thai Navy’s 102nd Squadron assembled and dropped a total of 2 mines at sea, mission planned together and conducted various joint missions in support of other CARAT units.

The CARAT mission nears the end to VP-4’s deployment, which earlier saw its crews flying search and rescue missions over Japan for Operation Tomodachi. “Now our crew is making new friends with the Thais through CARAT, so it’s been a great experience,” she added.

Approximately 1,800 U.S. Navy and Marine Corps personnel are participating in CARAT Thailand 2011. U.S. Navy ships from Task Group 73.1 include the amphibious dock landing ship USS Tortuga (LSD 46), the guided-missile destroyer USS Howard (DDG 83), the frigate USS Reuben James (FFG 57), and the rescue and salvage ship USNS Safeguard (T-ARS 50). Additional participants include an amphibious landing force of Marines from 2nd Battalion, 23rd Marines, U.S. Navy Seabees, a U.S. Coast Guard training team.

CARAT is a series of bilateral military exercises between the U.S. Navy and the Armed Forces of Bangladesh, Brunei, Cambodia, Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, and Thailand. Additionally, Vietnam participates in a CARAT-like skills exchange.


Videos of VP-4 found on the web

Howdy folks,

While working on the web site I found a couple of videos I thought I’d share with you all

Video 1: Commander Fleet Activities Okinawa, Part 1

Video 2: Commander Fleet Activities Okinawa, Part 2

VP-16 qualifies first CWO patrol plane commander

By Lt. j.g. Robert Maul
VP-16 PAO

VP-16 recently qualified CWO3 Dan Haller as a P-3C Orion patrol plane commander (PPC) – making him the first chief warrant officer PPC in P-3 fleet history. As a qualified PPC, Haller will be tasked to ensure the safe operation of the P-3C and ensure the crew and the aircraft return home safely.
The Flying Chief Warrant Officer Pilot Program was instituted in January of 2006. This extremely competitive program takes highly motivated enlisted Sailors and commissions them as warrant officers to complete training as naval pilots and naval flight officers (NFOs). The program allows chief warrant officers to serve as pilot or NFO in the P-3, EP-3, E-6 and the helicopter communities.
The goal behind qualifying warrant officers is to create naval pilots and NFOs who are not restricted to the career path that is taken by unrestricted line officers.
Haller enlisted in the Navy in August 1997 as an aviation machinist mate. He attended aircrew school and was soon qualified as a P-3C Orion flight engineer. He successfully completed tours with VP-9 and later as an instructor flight engineer at the P-3C Fleet Replacement Squadron, VP-30.
Haller was commissioned Dec. 1, 2006. After attending aviation preflight indoctrination and primary flight training in Pensacola, Haller completed advanced flight training in Corpus Christi, Texas and received his wings of gold in August 2008. He then returned to VP-30, this time as a student pilot, and was then assigned to VP-16 in May 2009.
Haller said, “It is an honor to pave the way for future warrant officer aviators. My only goal is to set the standard for all other flying warrants in the fleet.”
The historic achievement that Haller has accomplished serves as an example to all enlisted Sailors that other opportunities for advancement are available to them. The success that Haller has had during his career in naval aviation, as both an enlisted Sailor and as an officer, will bring the intrinsic benefits of the Flying Chief Warrant Officer Pilot Program to the attention of many within the aviation community and the Navy.

Read more at Jacksonville.com: http://jaxairnews.jacksonville.com/military/jax-air-news/2011-03-09/story/vp-16-qualifies-first-cwo-patrol-plane-commander?sms_ss=facebook&at_xt=4da86b4a44653c5d%2C1#ixzz1JvzM5lQ7

Photo courtesy of VP-16

Photo courtesy of VP-16